This type of behaviour is an insult to everyone who has ever attended RMC and did so with a high standard of decency, professionalism, and honour. The students involved should be ashamed of themselves as should those who stood by and did nothing.

I’ve met and spoke alongside Julie LaLonde several times. This is disgusting!

[su_divider top=”no” divider_color=”#006699″ link_color=”#006699″] [su_quote cite=”Brig.-Gen. Al Meinzinger”]I would like to reiterate my apology for the unprofessional behaviour of select Officer Cadets, and any challenges that resulted from the set up and organization of the presentation. Rest assured that corrective steps were taken against the most difficult groups.[/su_quote]

22may15_rmcThe general in charge of Royal Military College apologized to an expert on sexual assault prevention for the “unprofessional behaviour” of the school’s cadets, including “several incidents that could constitute harassment,” after she was invited to address the military’s future leaders last fall.

Brig.-Gen. Al Meinzinger sent a formal written apology to the Ontario Coalition of Rape Crisis Centres in February, five months after its Governor General’s Award-winning educator Julie Lalonde complained about being whistled at, cat-called, laughed at and openly disrespected by officer cadets she had been invited to speak to.

[su_quote cite=”Julie LaLonde”]At one point, one of the cadets looked me up and down, and said he might have listened to me if I wasn’t a woman and a civilian.[/su_quote]

[su_divider top=”no” divider_color=”#006699″ link_color=”#006699″] Related:

Kingston-Whig Standard: When award-winning feminist activist and educator Julie Lalonde found out the Royal Military College of Canada was going to require the entire school to attend sexual harassment briefings, she was thrilled to participate. Little did she know she would need an escort to her car afterwards.

Globe and Mail: The Royal Military College of Canada was told two years ago that senior cadets were sexually assaulting younger students, but the man who brought the problem to the attention of the institution’s leaders says his warnings received little more than a lackadaisical response. Michel Drapeau, a lawyer and retired military colonel, could see in 2013 that the military college had a very big problem on its hands. Young women were enrolling in the storied school in Kingston, Ont., in the hope of eventually serving their country – but instead were having their lives and career plans torn apart by sexual assaults being perpetrated by senior male cadets. More than 10 female cadets, most of them in their late teens, had turned to Mr. Drapeau for help. In every case, he said, the allegations “were a lot more than [inappropriate] touching.”