In a 1974 interview with David Frost, Muhammad Ali was asked, “What would you like people to think about you when you’ve gone?”

Ali responded, “I’d like for them to say: He took a few cups of love. He took one tablespoon of patience, one teaspoon of generosity, one pint of kindness. He took one quart of laughter, one pinch of concern. And then, he mixed willingness with happiness. He added lots of faith, and he stirred it up well. Then he spread it over a span of a lifetime.

“And he served it to each and every deserving person he met.”

From a very young age, I learned Muhammad Ali was a man on a mission. One of my earliest memories is my parents hoping someone would shut Ali’s mouth. To a five year old mom and dad represented the establishment, and if the establishment hated Ali he was on the right track. I had no idea how true that would turn out to be.

Muhammad Ali was a man to follow and I followed his career and life for almost fifty years. I am saddened by his death, but will always smile when I think of my hero – Muhammad Ali.


In 1981 Ali was passing a Chicago high-rise building when he noticed a commotion; a man was threatening to commit suicide by jumping from the ninth floor. Ali asked the police officers if he could help and duly coaxed the troubled man down from the ledge.

“My conscience won’t let me go shoot my brother, or some darker people, or some poor hungry people in the mud for big powerful America. And shoot them for what? They never called me nigger, they never lynched me, they didn’t put no dogs on me, they didn’t rob me of my nationality, rape and kill my mother and father. … Shoot them for what? How can I shoot them poor people? Just take me to jail.”

~ Muhammad Ali (1967)