/Sexual Assault
Sexual Assault 2016-10-21T21:42:37+00:00

Sexual Assault

teal_ribbonNot everyone will experience sexual assault the same way. It will effect you in a way that is as unique as you are. How you respond is a very personal decision. What works for some may not work for others. Some victims will seek and get justice while many others looking for it will end up feeling abandoned and devastated. Most will say nothing at all.

Your path to healing is your path to walk. There are many organizations and people who are there to help and support you. If you need to – reach out for help.

If you are a survivors loved one, or just a friend who cares, what you do and say is vitally important. Words can heal and words can hurt so always keep in mind what you say. Give the statistics around sexual assault and abuse someone in your life has been affected. If they haven’t opened up to you ask yourself if you’ve created an environment for them to feel safe enough to do so.

Support has many forms but one thing should rule how you help – ask first. What can you do, what do they need, and what do they want of you? Don’t try to control how someone else chooses to heal. And be honest – if you have no idea what to do or say than say so.

The Avalon Sexual Assault Centre in Halifax has put together some helpful information if you want to help someone who has been assaulted. If you are a loved one you need help too. Remember that. Reach out.

Sexual assault can happen to anyone regardless of age, race, gender, class, status, sexual orientation, ability, religion, or physical appearance. You can be sexually assaulted on a date, in your home, at work or on the street. You can be assaulted by a partner, trusted friend, close relative, or a complete stranger. There’s no such thing as a “typical” sexual assault.

Myths and Facts
What is Consent?
Sexual Assault Centres – CANADA
Sexual Assault Hotline – USA

You Are Never Alone!

If you have stories, thoughts, ideas, events, or information you feel should be shared please reach out and let me know. I’m open to guest posts as well.

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There are 460,000 sexual assaults in Canada every year!

460,000

There are 460,000 sexual assaults in Canada every year!

33

For every 1,000 sexual assaults only 33 are reported to the police.

12

For every 1,000 sexual assaults reported only 12 are prosecuted.

3

For every 1,000 sexual assaults only 3 lead to a conviction.

What is the Rape Culture?

Rape Culture is an environment in which rape is prevalent and in which sexual violence against women is normalized and excused in the media and popular culture.  Rape culture is perpetuated through the use of misogynistic language, the objectification of women’s bodies, and the glamorization of sexual violence, thereby creating a society that disregards women’s rights and safety.

Rape Culture affects every woman.  The rape of one woman is a degradation, terror, and limitation to all women. Most women and girls limit their behavior because of the existence of rape. Most women and girls live in fear of rape. Men, in general, do not. That’s how rape functions as a powerful means by which the whole female population is held in a subordinate position to the whole male population, even though many men don’t rape, and many women are never victims of rape.  This cycle of fear is the legacy of Rape Culture.

Examples of Rape Culture

  • Blaming the victim (“She asked for it!”)
  • Trivializing sexual assault (“Boys will be boys!”)
  • Sexually explicit jokes
  • Tolerance of sexual harassment
  • Inflating false rape report statistics
  • Publicly scrutinizing a victim’s dress, mental state, motives, and history
  • Gratuitous gendered violence in movies and television
  • Defining “manhood” as dominant and sexually aggressive
  • Defining “womanhood” as submissive and sexually passive
  • Pressure on men to “score”
  • Pressure on women to not appear “cold”
  • Assuming only promiscuous women get raped
  • Assuming that men don’t get raped or that only “weak” men get raped
  • Refusing to take rape accusations seriously
  • Teaching women to avoid getting raped instead of teaching men not to rape

Disclaimer: All information on this page is of a general nature and may not apply to any specific circumstance. It is not to be construed as legal advice or presumed to be completely accurate, or infinitely up to date. If you have questions regarding your case, please contact a local lawyer immediately. 

If you or anyone you know has experienced sexual assault of any kind, please contact any of these local rape crisis and support centres.

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